Southern Utah residents who switch to smart irrigation controllers can get rebates up to $150

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SOUTHERN UTAH– The Utah Division of Water Resources has received grant money to fund smart irrigation controller rebates across the state. Water conservancy districts in Iron and Washington counties are among those helping facilitate and administer the rebate program.

Iron County

Central Iron County Water Conservancy District recently announced a partnership with the Utah Division of Water Resources in helping administer the smart irrigation controller rebate program in Iron County.

In a press release from the conservancy district, USU Extension horticulturist Candace Schaible said most Cedar City residents are using twice as much water as they need to maintain a healthy landscape.

“There are a lot of factors that attribute to this, like poor irrigation design, leaks, and overwatering,” Schaible said, adding that the smart irrigation controllers address overwatering by using live weather data to pause the irrigation system when it’s raining or windy.

Smart irrigation controllers also automatically adjust as the seasons – and water needs – change and allow homeowners to easily control their irrigation systems from phones and tablets.

In 2014, the water district installed smart controllers at Three Peaks Elementary and two local parks in Iron County. Since then, an estimated 2.25 million gallons of water has been saved each year, an amount equivalent to the water used by seven families over the course of one year, both indoors and outdoors.

Residents of Iron County are eligible to apply for this program and receive 50 percent of the cost of a smart irrigation controller, up to $150. The Division of Water Resources has set up an online portal for easy application and approval of controllers at www.utahwatersavers.com.

Local home improvement and plumbing stores have a wide range of WaterSense labeled smart controllers, which are the only approved controllers for the rebate program.

Smart irrigation controllers work best when homeowners are educated on how to most effectively use them. Along these lines, the water district and USU Extension offer free summer water checks to residents of Iron County to help homeowners understand the water demands of a healthy lawn. To schedule a free water check, call the CICWCD at 435-865-9901.

Washington County

The Washington County Water Conservancy District is also helping administer the smart irrigation controller rebate program, in addition to a number of other water-saving initiatives, including programs focusing on more efficient sprinkler heads as well as household appliances that use water, such as washing machines and toilets. For more information, click here.

The WCWCD also provides free water checks to customers upon request and by appointment. Between May 15 and Sept. 30, residents can schedule an appointment for an irrigation specialist to come to their home and perform and a one-hour evaluation and sprinkler system test. The specialist will also recommend an efficient watering schedule. These recommendations typically results in an average water savings of 30 percent, according to the water district.

Since WCWCD first started the program in 2005, more than 1,500 water checks have been performed, resulting in an estimated water savings in excess of 19 billion gallons. Call WCWCD at 435-673-3617 to schedule an appointment or to ask about other available rebates and programs.

Residents of both counties and in other areas of the state are encouraged to visit the Utah Water Savers website for more information about the smart controller rebate program, along with other water-saving incentives.

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1 Comment

  • utahdiablo May 25, 2018 at 9:05 pm

    Yeah, “Smart” would be to not plant Grass in the Desert …

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